Arduino Pico adaptor board

There is now an Arduino adaptor shield that converts the Espruino Pico into an Arduino form factor. It is available as part of the Shim Collection available from Tindie

Eagle CAD board and schematic

Wiring

Simply solder an unpinned Espruino Pico flat onto the board (it should be soldered onto the side that contains the silkscreen).

You can solder a Pinned Pico flat by carefully removing the black plastic on the pins first, or you can solder just the 0.1" pins (however you will miss out on some connections - see below).

There is also room for a JST surface mount battery connector, just to the side of the Pico.

The two sets of surface mount pads by the JST connector are for 0805-size 4.7k resistors, which act as pullups for the I2C pins.

Software

The Pin mapping is as follows:

Arduino Pico
A0 A0 (on 0.05" pins)
A1 A1 (on 0.05" pins)
A2 A2 (on 0.05" pins)
A3 A3 (on 0.05" pins)
A4 A4 (on 0.05" pins)
A5 A5
D0 B7
D1 B6
D2 B1
D3 B3
D4 B4
D5 B5
D6 A6
D7 A7
D8 A8
D9 B10
D10 A10 (on 0.05" pins)
D11 B15
D12 B14
D13 B13
SCL B8 (on 0.05" pins)
SDA B9 (on 0.05" pins)

However to make this easier we've made a module that contains the pin mapping. You can do:

var ard = require("ArduinoPico");
// use normal arduino-style functions
digitalWrite(ard.D9, 1);
console.log(analogRead(ard.A0));
// or access pins directly
ard.D10.set();

If you're plugging this board into a Seeed Grove kit, you can also use the GroveArduinoPico module to get the correct pins.

Buying

You can:

  • Buy the Shim Pack that contains the Arduino adaptor amongst many other things.
  • Download the Eagle CAD board design (linked above) and upload it to be manufactured by a company such as OSHPark.

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